font-awesome-load
material-design-icons-load

The Salerno Ivories – re-photographed

The Photographic Campaigns before 1893

Documents from the beginning of the 16th century testify that the ivories were stored in a chapel, the so-called treasury, behind the cathedral’s sacristy in Salerno. Neither the provenance nor the original function of the reliefs can be determined. The carvings were temporarily assembled as an antependium or integrated into an altar and finally, after some plates had disappeared – immured.
By no later than the 1870s, art historians and scholars became increasingly interested in the plates. In 1903, the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, that had been founded only a few years earlier, purchased 35 photographs of the “Paliotto di Salerno“ by Romualdo Moscioni for 30 Lira. In the Photo Library’s inventory book, the series of photographs is listed together with the comment: “Blau angestrichen im Moscioni Katalog von 1893“ (“Marked in blue in the Moscioni Catalogue from 1893”). In Moscioni’s later catalogues from 1903 and 1921, they were offered for the same price. Besides the main plates of the New and the Old Testament, Moscioni also photographed some plaster casts that were most likely commissioned by the Italian art historian Demetrio Salazaro and used for his publication in 1871.
In historic total-view photographs, some of the plates photographed by Moscioni, such as “Noah’s Blessing”, cannot be seen. That is why it can be assumed that they were located at the side of the antependium. Two of Moscioni’s photographs show not only the hinges of the wooden frame, but also three amateurishly executed plaster casts with floral ornaments. The respective ivories, however, were not preserved.
The label that can be seen on one of Moscioni’s photographs on the upper edge of the antependium is attached to a thick cord and thus makes it seem like a museum object.


Romualdo Moscioni, Historical presentation of the plates as an antependium, left side, before 1893, Albumin paper print, 19,6 x 25,5 cm, Moscioni neg. no. 6111, KHI inv. no. 28894

Romualdo Moscioni, Historical presentation of the plates as an antependium, right side, before 1893, Albumin paper print, 19,9 x 25 cm, Moscioni neg. no. 6110, KHI inv. no. 3754

Romualdo Moscioni, “Moses Receiving the Law on Mount Sinai” (plaster cast?), before 1893, Albumin paper print, 19,8 x 25,2 cm, KHI inv. no. 3787

“Moses Receiving the Law on Mount Sinai”, 8,9 x 11,4 cm, KHI inv. no. 613828

Romualdo Moscioni, “Noah Leaves the Ark / The Sacrifice of Noah“ and a plate with floral ornament (plaster cast?), before 1893, Albumin paper print, 25,4 x 20 cm, Moscioni neg. no. 10385, KHI inv. no. 4345

“Noah Leaves the Ark / The Sacrifice of Noah“, 10,3-10,5 x 21,8 cm, KHI inv. no. 613780

Romualdo Moscioni, Frame fragments with floral decoration (plaster cast?), before 1893, Albumin paper print, 25,4 × 20 cm, KHI inv. no. 3788

Two fragments of ornamental frames, 12,6 × 7,2 cm; 7,5 × 7,2 cm, KHI inv. no. 613965

Romualdo Moscioni, “Miracle of the Rod / Miracle of the Leprous Hand” (plaster cast?), before 1893, Albumin paper print, 25,3 x 20 cm, Moscioni neg. no. 10387, KHI inv. no. 3785

Romualdo Moscioni, Historical presentation of the plates as an antependium, detail, before 1893, Albumin paper print, 25,5 x 19,9-20,2 cm, Moscioni neg. no. 10371, KHI inv. no. 3786

Apostle, 5,5 x 6 cm, KHI inv. no. 613989

Frame fragment, 24 x 7,1 cm, KHI inv. no. 613963




© KHI in Florence | 12.07.2020 18:02:34